Creative’s Inspiration 30 Writing and Artist Prompts for the Harvest Season


Just added to Funschooling Press!


This instant digital download offers 30 prompts to help inspire your creativity!

Writers and poets, artists, and musicians! If you’re a creative, then this is a great resource for you.

Harvest Inspirations is exactly that, open-ended inspiration, with tools to help you get unblocked, change your perspective, or challenge yourself to keep things interesting.

It starts with 30 Harvest-related prompts that are perfect for the harvest season (Thankfulness, Squirrels, Parade, Family Gathering, etc.) if those are enough to spark your creativity then go with it! If you need a little more, that’s okay too! There’s a ‘Perspective Page’ that gives you some questions to ask yourself with 6 examples! Then there’s the ‘Try This’ page, that gives you 20 activities that you can do with each and every prompt, that’s 600 possibilities, and that’s not even including the ‘Workout Web’, ‘Blockbuster Pages’ and ‘Create A Comic/StoryBoard’ page!

As a creative who has been educating for 25 years, I know that creativity is one of the unsung fundamentals of an intelligent mind. Whether you’re a Creative looking for inspiration, a student (of any age) looking to build your brain and skills, or a teacher trying to inspire creativity without blocking it, this publication is for you.

This 9 page document has 1 printer friendly chart of words, and 1 chart with a fall inspired picture background.
1 Perspectives Page filled with suggestions for using 6 of the words.
1 Try This page filled with 20 ways the words can be used.
3 Printer friendly pages to help work your thoughts out.

Pages are not editable.

For personal use only. Print as many pages as you need, but do not resell this file or any printed material for profit.

Do not share this file with others.

Copyright © by Fran W and Funschooling Press. All rights reserved.

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Creative’s Inspiration 30 Writing and Artist Prompts for the Month of October

Just added to Funschooling Press!

This instant digital download offers 30 prompts to help inspire your creativity!

Writers and poets, artists, and musicians! If you’re a creative, then this is a great resource
for you.

Creative’s Inspiration is exactly that, open-ended inspiration, with tools to help you get unblocked, change your perspective, or challenge yourself to keep things interesting.

It starts with 30 Fall-related prompts that are perfect for the month of October (scarecrow, blood curdling scream, chilly morning, etc.) if those are enough to spark your creativity then run with it! If you need a little more, that’s okay too! There’s a ‘Perspective Page’ that gives you some questions to ask yourself with 6 examples! Then there’s the ‘Try This’ page, that gives you 20 activities that you can do with each and every prompt, that’s 600 possibilities, and that’s not even including the ‘Workout Web’ and ‘Blockbuster Pages’!

As a creative who has been educating for 25 years, I know that creativity is one of the unsung fundamentals of an intelligent mind. Whether you’re a Creative looking for inspiration, a student (of any age) looking to build your brain and skills, or a teacher trying to inspire creativity without blocking it, this publication is for you.

This 11 page document has 1 printer friendly chart of words, and 3 charts with a fall inspired picture background.
1 Perspectives Page filled with suggestions for using 6 of the words.
1 Try This page filled with 20 ways the words can be used.
2 Printer friendly pages to help work your thoughts out.

Pages are not editable.

For personal use only. Print as many pages as you need, but do not resell this file or any printed material for profit.

Do not share this file with others.

Copyright © by Fran W and Funschooling Press. All rights reserved.

Connect with Funschooling and Recreational Learning!

Dictionaries – Day #5 Words Within Words


Looking for a fun game that uses a dictionary? Try this one out!

How many words can you find in the word…


Grab a piece of lined paper, write the word DICTIONARIES on the top of the page, and then find, and write, as many words as you can using the letters provided. Each letter can only be used once, unless there is more than one of that letter. Use a dictionary/spell checker to challenge words or to make sure a word is ‘real’!

When playing the game with multiple players, have players take turns writing down words. Use a timer to give each player between 30 seconds and 1 minute to say a word. If a usable word can not be given, the player can pass his turn to the next player.

Decide how long the game will run or how many words need to be found before starting the game.

If you would like to find some ways to make this game more challenging, please visit my post Words Within Words where you will find some interesting ways to play and links that will reveal the ‘hidden words’.

FYI: More than 1500 words can be made from DICTIONARIES!

🐞 If you have someone who is not spelling words on their own yet, play around with the letters together. Talk about vowels and consonants and ask them to pick out a vowel and two consonants and put the letters together in some way and read the word. Sometimes it will sound like and be a “real” word, sometimes it won’t. There are a bunch of 2 and 3 letter words that can be made with these letters.

You can also play with the letters that may be more familiar to them, like their name. The game: What’s In A Name? uses the person’s name and easy to manipulate letters to make learning more fun. 


Have a fun!

Related Post: Dictionaries – Access all the days in one place!

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Note: If this, or any other post on Funschooling and Recreational Learning, has inspired you in a positive way, or you have featured it in a blog post, please comment and link back to where it can be found! Thank you!

Dictionaries – Day #4 Types of Dictionaries


There are all different kinds of dictionaries in the world today. Some offer a lot of pictures and are called picture dictionaries, others offer words for a specific topic or subject. Check your local library for various dictionaries and see if there is one on your favorite topic.

There are visual dictionaries available on line, here is a small sampling…


http://www.visualdictionaryonline.com/ – Click on a picture or type what you are looking for in the search box. This site offers both words and pictures.


https://visuwords.com/dictionary – Put a word in the search bar on the top of the page and the site will show the word in the middle and branch off into other related words. It is similar to a mind map.When you move over a word with your mouse, its meaning will pop-up.


http://www.ikonet.com/en/visualdictionary/ –  Click on any picture to begin exploring one of the 17 themes the site has to offer. You can search for topics too. Click on the icon that looks like a speaker to hear how it’s said. Meanings for words are also provided in that area.


https://infovisual.info/en – Click on any topic offered or put your own word in the search bar. You’ll get a labeled picture with an explanation for each labeled part of the picture.


https://7esl.com/ – This is a visual dictionary of terms for people learning English. Scroll down the page for the meanings of each picture offered.


Regular online dictionaries…

For these sites, you can type a word in the search area to find out what it means.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/


http://www.dictionary.com/

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/


https://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/


http://www.thesaurus.com/ – This site offers both a dictionary and a thesaurus.


Look for specialized dictionaries too:

https://www.dailywritingtips.com/5-types-of-specialized-dictionaries/

Here’s an activity Everyone can do…little ones may need some help.


Make your own specialized dictionary based on a favorite topic: Use copy, graph, lined, or construction paper to make your dictionary, and staple or sew the booklet together. Write a letter on each page in ABC order, then choose a topic for your dictionary. Write a word on each page that begins with that letter. Next, add pictures or draw something that relates to your chosen topic if possible, and/or write its meaning, a little bit about it, a sentence, an observation, or something else.


Here’s a video about how to make a simple book, and while recommended for early learners, older kids and adults can use this concept to make their own books with better quality materials if desired.

This video shows how to bind your own books with a Saddle Stitch…

Related Post: Dictionaries – Access all the days in one place!


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Note: If this, or any other post on Funschooling and Recreational Learning, has inspired you in a positive way, or you have featured it in a blog post, please comment and link back to where it can be found! Thank you!

Dictionaries – Day #2 Alphabetize Your Family Members


Whether you have a lot of family members or just a few, today, you are encouraged to alphabetize in one or more of these fun ways.


  • Write down the name of your family members on a piece of lined paper, then alphabetize them on another piece of paper or the other half of the page you started with. Don’t forget grandparents, aunts, uncles, and pets!
  • Write your name or someone else’s name on lined paper, one letter per line, down one side of the page. Use capital letters.
  • Next come up with a word for each letter of the name you’ve chosen. Then alphabetize all the words. If your word has two or more letters that are the same, be sure to alphabetize those words correctly too.
How to Alphabetize:

https://www.thoughtco.com/how-to-alphabetize-1856896

🐞 If you have a little one, run through the alphabet with them so they can learn how to alphabetize. Sing an ABC song, read an ABC book, make a game out of the ABC’s, or play the Active Alphabet.


Related Post: Dictionaries – Access all the days in one place!

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Note: If this, or any other post on Funschooling and Recreational Learning, has inspired you in a positive way, or you have featured it in a blog post, please comment and link back to where it can be found! Thank you!

The Poe Project

I’m pleased to announce a brand new publication is available in my Etsy store, Funschooling Press, called The Poe Project‘.

The Poe Project is a 16 page Research Project and Activity based publication, written and developed by Fran Wisniewski.


This publication offers some interesting facts about Poe, more than 10 questions to start you on your learning journey, ideas to help spark your curiosity and help you express your creativity, and fun and inspiring family-friendly activities that include: A word find and cryptograms. The Poe Project offers printer-friendly templates, activities, and a coloring page.


The Poe Project is great for families who enjoy learning and playing together, self-directed learners, and anyone looking for activities related to learning about Edgar Allan Poe, one of the most famous classic authors in history, in a fun and informal way.


This one-of-a-kind publication contains: 

  • Facts about Poe’s life and accomplishments.
  • Leading questions to help get the learning process going. 
  • Poe inspired writing pages: One blank and one lined.
  • A word find and answer page.
  • Tips and suggestions for creating your own personalized Poe study. 
  • A printable information page to help you collect your thoughts.
  • Secret messages you can solve with a code I created for you.
  • A printable page of grids so you can design your own secret codes.
  • A printer-friendly page so you can create your own secret messages.
  • And a Poe coloring Page.
Plus, you have access to a time-saving resource page that’ll help get you started as soon as possible. 

Once you purchase your instant download, you’ll be able to begin your personal learning adventure.

I hope you’ll take the time to check out The Poe Project and get your copy today for $10!

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Louis Braille

Louis Braille

WikipediaLouis Braille – History of Louis Braille and information about the braille system.

AFB: Braille BugWhat is braille?, information about Louis Braille and Helen Keller. Games – Name game, Braille Jumble, riddles and rhymes, and more.

PBS Kids: You’ve Got Braille! – 
Braille translator. Write your own message and have it translated into braille.

Omniglot: Writing Braille – Braille alphabet and number charts.

Suggested Activities

Put dots of glue, or old nail polish, on index cards to make each letter of the braille alphabet. Once dry, put letters together to form words and read them with your fingers.

Use puff paint to make raised letters, shapes, and numbers.

Close your eyes and try to figure out what letters/words another player gives you.

Make braille cards with numbers on them and come up with a counting or match game.

Make shapes on index cards with hot glue and match braille words with pictures.


Video



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Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Pictographs

Pictograph by Fran W.

Symbol World – Learn how to communicate using pictures.

Mr. Donns: Native American Symbol Stories – Symbols that tell a story.

Texas Beyond History: Create Your Own Pictograph – Make brushes and paint from natural items and writing suggestions.

Pictopen –  Modern pictograph writing.

Pictograhic Stories – Native American signs and picture writing
Native American Pictographs – Printable symbol pages

Wikipedia: 
Writing System – History of writing systems
Rebus – A rebus uses pictures to represent words or parts of words.
Ideograms – A graphic symbol that represents an idea or concept.
Logogram – Logograph where each symbol represents a concept rather then a sound. Includes earliest writing systems.
Pictogram – Conveys its meaning through its pictorial resemblance.

A to Z Teacher Stuff: Creating Stories Using Pictographs – Native American activity

Native Americans: Pictographs – Pictographs, Signals, Sign Language – Site talks about Native American communication.

Types of Graphs: Pictographs – Article talks about how modern day pictographs are used.

Geology.com: Pictograph – Photo gallery of pictographs from around the world.

Fun Science Gallery – The History of Writing – An essay about the history of writing. 

Videos

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Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed ab
out the post! Thank you!

Calligraphy Resources

Calligraphy Tools By Fran W.

Information About Calligraphy

History, Cultural, Types


Calligraphy: Manuscript: History of Calligraphy – Site offers historical information and writing samples.

Art of Calligraphy: PDF article about the history of calligraphy.

Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History: Chinese Calligraphy – History of Chinese calligraphy.

Wikipedia: Calligraphy – Information about the tools used, traditions, modern calligraphy and photos.

Printable Practice Papers & DYI Pen & Ink


Printable Paper: Download printable practice pages. Variety of pages offered.


eHow: Homemade India Ink & Make Calligraphy Ink From Acrylic Paint

Embelish: How To Make Your Own Colorful Calligraphy Ink

Instructables has two tutorials for making your own writing instrument.
DIY Calligraphy Pens & Make a calligraphy pen out of a bulrush (cattail) reed

Council of ElrondCalligraphy: Make Your Own Ink & Quill Pen

Regia Anglorum: Quills – This site offers a few authentic ways to make quills and ink in addition to some historical information.

Videos

Click on arrow next to ‘Playlist’ to see the title names.



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If you find a broken link please let me know by leaving a comment!

Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Active Alphabet



Act out the alphabet with a fun game that can be played verbally, with letter cards, or by making picture cards with letters on them.
To make cards, you will need…
Index cards, glue and: something to draw/write with, stickers, old magazines, or graphics.
What to do:
  • Draw pictures, write letters or put stickers on index cards.
  • Cut pictures from old magazines or use graphics and glue them onto index cards. 
  • Use commercial alphabet cards: Some alphabet cards have pictures that can be acted out, otherwise you can mix up the cards and use the letters. 
  • Make up your own list of words that can be acted out or use some of these examples:

A = Airplane, Angel, Ape, Archer, Anger, Act
B = Ball, Bounce, Ballerina, Book, Bicycle, Bird, Bow, Blow bubbles
C = Cat, Clap, Climb, Cold, Canoe (paddle down river), Curtsy, Crab
D = Dog, Dig, Dip, Dance, Dolphin
= Elephant, Ear, Eat, Eyes (do something fun with your eyes)
F = Frog, Flower (pick a flower, smell it), Fish, Flexible, Funny face, Frown, Fall down
= Grin, Gather, Gum, Gym (pretend to workout), Golf
H = Hop, Happy, High-Five, Horse, Hula hoop, Hand, Hug
I = Ice cream, Itch, Ice skate
J = Jog, Jump, Juggle, Jumping Jack
K = Kick, King, Kangaroo, Karate, Kiss
L = Laugh, Look, Lollipop, Lick, Lion, Lizard
M = Move, March, Moo, Melting ice cream (‘melt’ slowly to the ground), Monkey
N =  Nose, Neigh, Nod, Nothing (stand still), Ninja Turtle
O = Open, Oink, Owl (hoot), Oar (row boat) 
P = Pop (pop mouth or pop up), Pout, Pick, Punch balloon, Pretend  
Q = Quiet, Queen, Quick
R = Run, Ride a Horse, Race car driver
S = Sit, Stand, Stomp, Squirrel, Superhero, Scared, Surfer, Slow motion, Snake 
T = Talk, Tap, Twist, Touch, Turn, Tickle, Tiptoe, Turtle
U = Umbrella, Up, Under, Unicycle
V = Vacuum, Victory sign, Victorious (arms up in air), Vulture, Vampire Bat
W = Wiggle, Walk, Washing machine/Wash board, Wink, Whistle, Wave, Walrus
X = Make an X shape with your body, X-Men, Xylophone
Y = Yo-Yo, Yodel, Yell, Yummy (rub tummy)
Z = Zebra, Zipper, Zig-Zag
Tips & Suggestions…
  • Keep the game open-ended and playful.
  • When possible, encourage players to make sound effects while performing an action.
  • Young people are very creative! Ask them to think of ways to act out each picture/word and encourage them to come up with their own actions for each letter. If a player can not think of a word, help them out.
  • Play this game verbally by saying a letter and giving players a chance to act out their own words or a player can say a word and players can act it out in their own way.
  • Players can form letters of the alphabet with their body.
  • Play an animal version of the game. Animals can be a lot of fun to act out and can add a little challenge to the game!
  • Encourage silliness.
  • Challenge players to combine letter words whenever possible or come up with an attribute that an object does, real or not, that begins with the same letter, for example: a kicking kangaroo, marching monkey, laughing lizard, etc.
  • Put letter/picture cards in a container, have players take turns pulling out cards and acting them out in their own way.
  • Play this game outdoors as a chalk or charades-type game.
  • When the fun ends, so does the game.
Natural Benefits: Builds large motor skills, allows for creativity/imagination, builds letter recognition and letter-word comprehension skills, it’s a physical activity, the game is open-ended, all ages can play!
Personal Note: A few years ago I compiled a list that used an action word for every letter of the alphabet with a group of parents. The result came to be known as, “The Active Alphabet“. Parents reported that their kids, especially the ones full of energy, enjoyed the game and gained letter recognition skills more easily as a result of playing it with their children. Over the years we have played this game and have added our own ideas to it to make it more interesting and fun, I encourage families to do the same.

This post is part of the Building Writing Skills series on Fran’s World of Discovery. If you are interested in reading more from this series, please use the following links:

Building Writing Skills Naturally – Offers links to activity suggestions that have many built in benefits.

No More Tears! – Introduction page.
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Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!