Funschooling News #12

Hi! Welcome to Funschooling News!


I’m offering more great family-friendly activities that will help make your week a little more fun. This week’s activities include baking soda related resources. This inexpensive item can be turned into an awesome learning tool!

 Be sure to scroll all the way down to the Special Days section where you’ll find a fun activity to do or an interesting topic to learn about each day of the week. 


Baking Soda


Baking soda is another convenient and inexpensive item you may have in your home for science projects. If you click on the link below, you will find 13 great science experiments that are fun for all ages. 

Some experiments may require supervision.

Baking Soda Science Projects

I hope something in this post makes you smile!

Still Learning Something New: Homeschool Humor
Here’s a peek at what you’ll find…

Funschooling Press: On Sale Until Sept 22

25% off Johnny Appleseed 4 in 1 Puzzle Page 



Johnny Appleseed Day is celebrated on September 26th!
Check out today!
Funschooling Videos

Baking Soda


Baking soda can cause some very cool chemical reactions and produce fun or useful results. The videos below offer both fun and practical things that can be done with baking soda. For the video with ’10 baking soda hacks’, test some of the uses out to see how well they work. Some of the videos may require supervision because of the materials used in the experiments or the results. 
The last video features a math art project to do.

Baking Soda Slime 



Black Fire Snake – Amazing Science Experiment
Supervision Suggested

10 Awesome Baking Soda Life Hacks

Math Game Idea: Infinity Tiles


Printable template available on this site.

Special Days & Holidays Sept 16-22


Betty Jo, of Still Learning Something New, has posted the newest version of her September 2018 Special Days Calendar. It has a long list of famous birthdays, historical events, interesting days, monthly event and food themes, and more. 
Betty Jo and I have created a Special Days Companion filled with 120+ activities you can do as a family during the month of September. To find out more about this wonderful product, click here.

Here are a few of the things on her list and some helpful activities and links:

One of September’s themes is Preparedness. This link will take you to a resource page that will give you information about getting prepared for a storm or bad weather.

🎩September 16Illusionist David Copperfield born 1956 – This link offers a Magic Tricks Resource Page that features Copperfield and many other great magicians plus some magic tricks to learn how to do.
Watch the YouTube video that features The Magic of David Copperfield – FULL MOVIE

September 17Constitution Day – Read the constitution with the resources provided. There are videos available in this post as well.
Constitution Week Begins on the 17th as well and Still Learning Something New has some great resources such as quizzes, School House Rock videos, and more.

September 18: Cheeseburger Day –  Find out how this fun food day got its start and make some with your favorite toppings.

September 19Talk Like A Pirate Day Celebrate this fun day with the resources on this pages such as: The history of pirates, pirate crafts, and information that crosses the curriculum.
Learn how to tie knots too!
Still Learning Something New’s Pirate resources include: Biographical info, YouTube videos, night sky resources, a compass activity, and more.


September 20Artist Dale Chihuly born 1941 – Learn about this interesting artist, make a virtual macchia, watch some videos, and more.

🍌September 21Banana Festival – Read an article about the benefits of bananas and make something delicious with bananas like banana bread.

🎈September 22Scientist Michael Faraday born 1791 – Learn about this fascinating man and his important accomplishments. One of the things Faraday invented was the balloon, you’ll find info about them in the post too. 

🍁September 221st Day of Autumn/Autumnal Equinox – What is the fall equinox? Find out with the resources in this post. Check out some of the other Autumn Resources too.

Thank you for stopping by, please feel free to share this post with others!
Have a wonderful week!

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Note: If this, or any other post on Funschooling and Recreational Learning, has inspired you in a positive way, or you have featured it in a blog post, please comment and link back to where it can be found! Thank you!

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5 Fun Vinegar Experiments


Vinegar may not smell all that great, but is a safe and fun way to explore some really cool chemical reactions!


For the following experiments you will need…

White vinegar, baking soda, a cooked chicken leg bone, 1-2 eggs, a recycled water bottle, balloons, measuring spoons and cups, a jar with a lid, a bowl, funnel, a spoon, a magnifying glass, a zip-top bag (sandwich sized), bathroom tissue and tape 
Optional: Dish soap, food dye, a length of yarn, scissors, and a ruler

Experiment #1: A Chemical Reaction

In this simple experiment, you will add 1 teaspoon of baking soda and 2T of  vinegar to a bowl and observe the results. You may have done this before, so to make it more interesting, add a few drops of your favorite colored food dye and a few drops of dish soap to the baking soda before adding the vinegar.
Experiment further to get the best reaction possible.

Experiment #2: Capture A Chemical Reaction
In this experiment, you are going to use a funnel to add 1 tablespoon of baking soda into a balloon and 1c of vinegar into a recycled water bottle. Carefully cover the top of the bottle with the open end of the balloon without releasing the baking soda into the bottle. When the balloon is in place, allow the the baking soda to fall into the vinegar and observe the results.

Tips: Talk about what you think is going to happen before mixing the baking soda and vinegar together. 
Measure how large the balloon gets with a length of yarn and a ruler.
 Try the experiment with different vinegar and baking soda ratios, and fresh balloons of the same size, and compare the results.

Experiment #3: Bend A Bone

In this experiment you are going to start by testing the strength of a leg bone without snapping it. Next, put it in a jar, add enough vinegar to cover the bone and close the lid. Check the bone in 3 days and test its strength. Compare the results to the day you added it to the solution. In another 4 days check the bone again and test its strength again. 
Put the bone back into the solution and check on it in a month.
What happened to the bone each time you checked on it? 
What was the final result?


Experiment #4: Rubber Egg

Put 1 raw egg in a jar and cover it with vinegar. Refrigerate the jar and check on it in 24 hours. Remove the egg carefully with a spoon and put it aside, then dump out the vinegar. Rinse the jar out, put the egg back in the jar carefully, cover it with vinegar, and refrigerate for another 24 hours. Remove the egg, rinse it off, and observe the final results with your hands and then with a magnifying glass.

What happened to the shell? Why did it happen?

Check out Imagination Station: How to make a naked egg to find out what happened and to take this experiment one step further.

Experiment #5: Cause An Explosion

You may want to do this experiment outside! 
Using two pieces of bathroom tissue put together, add 1T of baking soda to the middle, then fold it up to form a little packet. Use a piece of tape to keep it together.
Next add a 1/2c of vinegar to a sandwich sized bag. 
Add the baking soda packet to the bag but hold it away from the vinegar while you zip the bag closed. When you are ready, drop the packet into the vinegar, and give the bag a shake before putting it down on the ground. 
Step back and observe the results.
Try this experiment with different amounts of baking soda and vinegar and different sized bags.

Related Posts:

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Rock & Mineral Resources

Types of Rocks & Minerals

Rocks & Minerals by Fran W.

Scholastic: StudyJams: Minerals – Site offers pictures with information under each one.

Science Kids: Rocks & Minerals – Earth facts about rocks and minerals.

One Geology:Rocks & Minerals – Kid friendly interactive site.

Interactive Sites For EducationRocks & Minerals – Click on a window to go to a new site with an interactive game that is rock related.


Geology.com: Rocks – Site offers lots of pictures and information, including news about rocks and minerals.

Minerals.net – This site offers a vast selection of minerals in A-Z format. Click on a name to find out the chemical make up of the item selected, in addition to group, specific gravity and much more. Pictures are also provided.

KidsKonnect: Rocks & Minerals – Quick facts.

Mineralogy4Kids – Click on a icon to begin reading short bits of information.

Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Rocks & Minerals – This site offers information about the rocks and minerals found in Florida, a page of examples with pictures and a pdf Guide to Rocks and Minerals of Florida.

UF: Florida’s Rocks & Minerals – Printable leaflet available.


*Symbolism & Mythology

PettyRock: Crystal Meaning –  Fun Facts: Gem Myths and Meanings

Ellen Steiber: About The Stones: Gem lore across cultures.


Crystal-Cure: Gemstones: Meanings & Properties– Site offers information and pictures about many gemstones: their meaning and the beliefs surrounding them.


Gem Select: Gemstone Meanings – Click on each name to find out more about the gemstone.


Peaceful Mind: Crystal & Gemstone Therapy  – Site offers a crystal dictionary of metaphysical meanings and meanings.


Burke Museum: Birthstones– Site offers information about each month’s birthstones, including myths and histories.

Experiments

Fran’s World of Discovery: Geodes – Information about geode creation, and experiments to make on your own.

Steve Spangler: Rock and Mineral Experiments – Sites offer 9 experiments.

Education.com: Geology Science Fair Projects  – 46 Experiments are offered on this site.

A2Z Home’s Cool: Geology Experiments for Kids – Site offers 5 links to other sites.


MSN: K-6 Rock Cycle: Understanding The Earth’s Crust – Offers lessons and experiments for grades K-6.


Videos





*Some of the resources used in this post sell items. I am not affiliated with them in any way.



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If you find a broken link, please let me know by leaving a comment! If you have a site to share, please leave me a comment with the URL. Thank you!

Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Glow-in-the-Dark Fun Putty

Here’s a fun way to explore chemistry with this glow-in-the-dark experiment.

You will need:

1T Glue, 1T liquid laundry starch, ½-1 tsp non-toxic glow-in-the-dark paint, a 4oz disposable cup, and a craft stick

Directions: Put glow-in-the-dark paint in a small cup, add glue and liquid laundry starch and mix with a craft stick. Put the cup in a sunny window and play with it in a dark place. When it stops glowing, put it back in the sun or shine light on it. When not in use, store in a zip-top bag in the refrigerator for up to 1 month. More glow paint can be added if needed.

Find out the chemistry behind fun putty and get some fun ways to use it.

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Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Snowflake Science

Borax Snowflake by Fran W
Snow Crystals: – This site has a lot of information about snowflakes and snow crystals including how they are formed, photos, physics and other interesting information. Read an interview about “Snowflake Science” with Kenneth Libbrecht, the creator of site, ‘Snow Crystals’, on RadioLab.

Home Science Tools: Snowflake Activities – This site has three science based activities to do: 1 – Collect snowflakes 2 – Make Borax snowflakes and 3 – Preserve snowflakes.

BrainPOP: Snowflakes – Offers a video about how snowflakes form and how they become the shape they do. A membership may be required for more interaction with this site.

Livescience: Snowflake Science: How it Snows for Days in the Artic – Researchers are making new discoveries about ice crystals; read about what they are learning.

Make Fake Snow: To make fake snow, you will need: a clean disposable diaper, a bowl and water.
Cut a diaper open in the middle and shake the contents into a bowl, add water a little at a time until you get the desired consistency for your snow. The diaper material will expand as it absorbs the water. If you want a slushy snow, add more water. If you want drier snow, add a little salt. Put the “snow” in the freezer for about 5-10 minutes to help it feel more like real snow. Food coloring can also be added. When the fun is over, throw the contents into the garbage, never down the drain.

Observation Activity: If you live in an area that snows, collect some snowflakes on black paper to see what they look as they fall. Bring a magnifying glass or a pocket microscope with you so you can take a closer look. While you’re outside, use your senses to observe what’s going on while it’s snowing. What do you hear, see, smell, taste and feel? Try to make as many observations as possible and write them down, draw them out or make a video log of your experience. Go outside before and after it snows and observe what the weather is like and document that as well.



Related posts on Fran’s World of Discovery:

Snowflake Math – Learn about snowflake symmetry and fractals.

Snowflake Language, Social Studies, History and Geography Skills – Snowflake stories, word puzzles, interesting phenomenon, symbolic meaning of and other activities.
Snowflake Resources and Activities – All the links to the resources can be found here, plus snowflake snack ideas, printables, and videos. 

Connect with Funschooling & Recreational Learning!


Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!


Chocolate Activities

Chocolate Activities by Fran W.
Make a day out of learning about chocolate in some really fun ways!

Learn about chocolate, make an old time chocolate egg cream, find out if chocolate is a fruit or a veggie, and get links to other chocolate resources such as virtual field trips, puzzles and historical information.

Homemade Hot Cocoa Mix

Make your own delicious hot cocoa mix and get tips on how to make an extra special treat out of it!

Learn how to make delicious chocolate covered pretzels.

Directions for making your own cocoa lip balm. 

Make your own body wash or bubble bath.
Connect with Funschooling and Recreational Learning!

Note:  Has this or another activity on Funschooling and Recreational Learning inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Chocolate covered pretzels

Chocolate Covered Pretzels by Fran W

Chocolate covered pretzels are really easy and fun to make at any age, and they make a great gift too!

To make your own, you will need…

1-2 1lb Bags of real chocolate chips

Pretzel Rods or your favorite shaped pretzel – 1 Large bag/container or 2 small

Bowl or heat-proof container

Spoon or a fork

Parchment paper

Flat pan

Plastic zip-top bags or long air-tight containers

Optional: Mini chocolate chips, nuts, cookie pieces, crushed peppermint sticks, shredded coconut, candy bits, white chocolate chips, nonpareils candy (sprinkles), sugar crystals, crushed candy such malted milk balls, toffee bars, etc.


What to do…

Melt chocolate in a heat proof container in either the microwave or a double boiler, dip pretzels in chocolate, knock off excess chocolate, place on a parchment covered pan and sprinkle with a favorite topping. When the chocolate hardens put pretzels in zip-top bags or air-tight containers.

Try different types of flavored melting chips too: Milk Chocolate, white chocolate, butterscotch chips, peanut butter, etc.

Helpful Tips…

For best results, use real chocolate or melting chips.

When using the double boiler method to melt chocolate, do not get chocolate wet! Water will make the chocolate unusable for dipping pretzels!

If you decide to use small pretzels, put them in the melted chocolate and take them out with a fork. Tap off excess chocolate before putting them on parchment paper and decorate while wet.

To dip pretzel logs, use a tall heat-proof cup or mug and tilt it to cover as much of the pretzel as possible. Use a spoon to cover more space and leave a little pretzel on the bottom so it can be picked up and held easily. Tap off excess before placing on parchment paper.

If needed, put chocolate covered pretzels in a refrigerator for a 5-10 minutes to speed up the cooling process. Warning, if kept in the refrigerator too long, the chocolate may turn white, if this happens, they can still be eaten.

To give as a gift, put pretzels in an air-tight bag or container.

Related activities on Fran’s World of Discovery…

Chocolate Activities
Holiday Gift Wrap

Connect with Fran’s World of Discovery!

Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way? Have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be fo
und, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Apple Experiment: Preventing Oxidation

Apple Oxidation by Fran W.

Why do apple slices turn brown?


Whenever an apple is cut, peeled, hit or dropped, cell walls are damaged. Enzymes called polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and iron-containing phenols are exposed to the oxygen in the air and oxidation occurs.

Fruits and vegetables such as apples, mango, potatoes, bananas, peaches and pears all turn brown (oxidize).
How can we stop oxidation or slow the process down?

– We can reduce the pH on the surface of the apple by using an acid like lemon juice.

– We can cook the apple slices to make the enzymes inactive.

– We can also stop or reduce oxidation by reducing the amount of oxygen available. We can do this by placing the apple slices in water or by putting the apple slices in a vacuum packed container.

– Dehydrate the apple slices. When you dehydrate something, you remove the water and that stops foods from spoiling.

Apples by Becka V.

Try one or more ways for yourself in the following experiment…

Before you enjoy your next apple, cut two slices off and give this experiment a try:
Leave one apple slice alone and use one of the ways mentioned above to stop the other slice from turning brown. Time how long it takes for the slices to turn brown.

If you have a variety of apples in the house, cut a slice off each one and find out which apple turns brown the fastest and the slowest.

Related Apple Activities on Funschooling & Recreational Learning:

Apple Research Project
Funschooling & Recreational Learning has created an apple research project with links to other apples sites and videos about apples: How to make an apple puzzle, the health benefits of apples, and how apples grow.


Make a quick and easy apple cider that tastes like warm apple pie!

This experiment is an example of one of the activities that can be found in the Johnny Appleseed ebook, written and developed by Fran Wisniewski. Click on the link above to learn more or click on the link below to purchase. 
Connect with Funschooling & Recreational Learning!

Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way, or have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link back to where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!

Homemade Apple Cider

This beverage is so rich and delicious, it’s like have warm apple pie in a glass!

Ingredients:


2c Apple juice or cider
1T Brown sugar (packed) 
½T Maple syrup
¼tsp Pumpkin pie spice 
1tsp Butter 
Cinnamon stick for stirring  (optional)
Whipped cream

Directions:
Pour apple juice/cider into a medium saucepan and heat on a low setting for about 2 minutes. Stir in brown sugar, maple syrup and pumpkin pie spice. Heat until steam rises out of the pot (do not boil), and the sugar has melted (about 3 minutes). Remove from heat and add butter, stirring until melted.
Pour cider into heat-proof cups, top with whipped cream, and serve with a cinnamon stick. 

This delicious recipe makes 4 – 1/2 c servings.

Related Apple Activities on Fran’s World:


Fran’s World of Discovery: Apple Resources
Fran’s World of Discovery has created an apple resource page filled with links to other apples sites and videos about apples: How to make an apple puzzle, the health benefits of apples, and how apples grow.


This yummy recipe is an example of one of the activities that can be found in the Johnny Appleseed ebook written by Fran Wisniewski. Click on the link above to learn more or click on the link below to purchase.  

Add to Cart

Connect with Fran’s World of Discovery!

Note: Has this or another activity on Fran’s World of Discovery inspired you or someone else in a positive way, or have you featured this activity in a blog post? I invite you to comment and link to back where your post can be found, or tell me what you or your family enjoyed about the post! Thank you!


Fall Leaves

Did you know…

Chlorophyll gives leaves their green color, carotenoid gives them an orange color, xanthophylls give a yellow color, anthocyanin gives a red color and tannin gives a brown color.


Question…


During the summer we see green leaves. Leaves change colors in the fall…or do they? How and why do leaves change colors in the fall? Watch this 3:11 minute video to find out.


Take a deeper look:


Collect some leaves and look at them with a magnifying glass or a microscope.


Learn more:



Fall by Fran W.

Enchanted Learning: Leaves and Leaf Anatomy
Learn about leaf function and structure and leaf terms.

Maine Foliage: How leaves reveal their fall colors
Animation of how leaves change colors.

Science Made Simple: Why do autumn leaves change colors in the fall?
This site explains what leaves are, why they change color, and offers a few leaf projects and word scrambles.


EEK! Why Do Leaves Change Color?
Why do leaves change color? Where do leaf colors come from? Does weather effect leaf color? Find the answers to these questions here!

Leaf activities on Funschooling and Recreational Learning

Experiment: Chromatography of Leaves

Leaf People and Creatures


Colorful Leaf Rubbings


Leaf Identification Activities


Leaf Prints & Leaf Stencils


Leaf Hunting